World

Age restrictions for some vaccine locations, CDC map update


Where can parents get their children vaccinated against COVID-19? The answer may depend on their age.

Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will update its county-by-county community-level maps on Thursday.

Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic in Illinois today:

Can children under 5 get the COVID vaccine at Walgreens? Here’s what you need to know

Children ages six months to 5 years are finally eligible to receive the COVID vaccine, thanks to last week’s clearance from the Food and Drug Administration and recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And according to the Chicago Department of Public Health, hospitals, clinics and pediatricians’ offices across the city are opening appointments and placing orders for Pfizer and Moderna vaccines to be administered.

Local pharmacies and drugstores are too.

However, not all children are able to receive the long-awaited vaccine at all vaccination locations.

Here is a breakdown.

The CDC will update the county’s COVID maps on Thursday

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will update its county-by-county community-level maps on Thursday.

Last week, 25 counties across the state remained at a “high” community level of COVID-19. Chicago, however, went from high to medium.

Check back for more as the maps are updated.

How long are you quarantining or isolating for COVID?

As summer gatherings intensify and extremely hot temperatures send people indoors, many are wondering how long they should quarantine or self-isolate if they are exposed or test positive for COVID.

Here’s a rundown of the CDC’s updated guidelines, including when to quarantine or isolate and information about the incubation period.

DuPage County to open registration for pediatric COVID vaccines by Friday

The DuPage County Health Department on Tuesday announced plans for its rollout of COVID vaccines for young children.

The health department said it “expects enrollment for the pediatric COVID-19 vaccine to open by Friday, June 24 for appointments at our central public health center in Wheaton.”

Residents looking for appointments before this time can check availability at www.vaccine.gov.

For more vaccine options for children under 5, click here.

Cook County prepares to start vaccines for children under 5 next week

Cook County Health announced Tuesday that it plans to begin vaccinating the first pediatric patients starting next week.

Appointments will be required, but the county said additional details will be released “as they become available.”

“Cook County Health is looking forward to providing COVID-19 vaccines to children 6 months to 4 years old soon!” the ministry said in a statement.

For more vaccine options for children under 5, click here.

COVID vaccines for children under 5: how soon can you make an appointment and where? What there is to know

Where can parents take their children to get their first dose of the COVID vaccine, how soon can you make an appointment, and what is the difference between the two vaccines?

As vendors wait for their shot shipments to arrive, here’s what to know.

Where to get COVID vaccines for children under 5 as shots begin in Illinois

With children under 5 now eligible for the first time during the coronavirus pandemic, where can parents take their children to get their first dose in Illinois and when?

Here is a list.

COVID vaccines for children under 5: side effects, dosage and more

COVID-19 shots for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in the United States are set to begin this week, but when and where can you get them and what parents need to know?

Parents have been lobbying federal officials for months for the ability to protect their youngest children as more adults shed their masks and abandon other public health precautions.

Here’s what we know so far.

Coronavirus FAQ: How long can COVID symptoms appear, what to do if you continue to test positive

Even though the COVID-19 pandemic has been going on for more than two years, individuals may still have many questions if they end up testing positive for the virus.

When testing positive, patients may be curious about how long they will be contagious, how to self-isolate and for how long, and what to do if they continue to test positive for the virus even after their illnesses have disappeared. symptoms.

Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the virus.

Here’s who’s eligible for COVID vaccines after the CDC’s latest recommendations

Infants, toddlers and preschoolers 6 months to 5 years old are newly eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine following a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Saturday.

The CDC has decided that coronavirus vaccines should be open to nearly all children, with CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky giving final approval Saturday afternoon.

As new groups become eligible for COVID vaccines, some people are asking for the CDC’s latest vaccination recommendations for all Americans.

Here’s the advice from federal health officials.

How long are you contagious with COVID? Here’s what the CDC says

If you test positive for coronavirus, you may have several questions, including how long you’re contagious, how long should you quarantine and more.

With the increase in COVID cases in the Chicago area and parts of the United States, local health officials have issued warnings to take precautions, especially in areas where the risk of transmission is increasing.

Here’s a rundown of the CDC’s updated guidelines, including when to quarantine or isolate and information about the incubation period.

How accurate are COVID home tests? Here’s what we know so far

With gatherings and summer events intensifying as temperatures warm, many people are testing themselves for COVID-19 to make sure they don’t spread the virus, but how accurate are the tests?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “positive self-test results are highly reliable.”

Negative results, however, may not rule out infection, especially in people with symptoms of COVID-19, the CDC says.

Details here.

Test negative for COVID, but have symptoms? Here’s what you need to know

If you have symptoms of COVID and have been exposed, but continue to test negative for the virus, what does this mean?

There have been anecdotal reports of people contracting the virus but not testing positive for several days, despite being symptomatic. Others are not positive at all. So how can you tell?

Learn more here.

If you’re still coughing after recovering from COVID-19, are you still contagious? How long should you quarantine yourself and when should you get tested? Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady explains what you need to know.

How soon could you catch COVID again after the initial infection?

After being infected with COVID-19, how long are you protected by antibodies and when could you contract the virus again?

Although questions have been asked over the past two years, the answers have changed as new variants are discovered.

The omicron variant, for example, has led to a major shift in “natural immunity”, with many previously infected people likely to be re-infected with the new version of the virus.

Timeline of COVID symptoms: signs to expect with the virus and when

For those who test positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, what signs should you watch for and how long can they last?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, symptoms of COVID can appear anywhere from two to 14 days after a person has been exposed to the virus. You can end isolation after five full days if you have been fever-free for 24 hours without using fever medication and your other symptoms have improved.

Learn more here.

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button